Wildlife in the roof when demolishing a house. 

Wildlife in the roof when demolishing a house. 

Recently in Sydney suburbs such as Ryde, Gladesville, Denistone, Eastwood and surrounding areas, Home Demolitions has found some wildlife lurking in places that often get overlooked. Be it possums, snakes or even bats, we strive to make sure wildlife gets a chance to leave before demolition begins. In the event the wildlife doesn’t leave, we always contact the appropriate wildlife services so animals can be safely removed.

Do I need to empty my house before demolition?

Do I need to empty my house before demolition?

When demolishing a home often many household items are found left behind. This can be due to many factors be it renters leaving things behind, home owners looking to leave behind old items and start over, items being over looked or even items that are hidden away in cavities such as roofs, under houses or sometimes buried.

Thinking About Demolishing? Here Are Five Things You Need To Know.

Thinking About Demolishing? Here Are Five Things You Need To Know.

There is a lot more to demolition than meets the eye and although we certainly couldn’t fit everything in one blog post, here are a few pointers to get you in the right direction if you are thinking about demolishing. 

So You Want To Demolish A House Part Four: Structural Demolition

For the uninitiated, demolishing a house can be a daunting task. There are countless factors that can effect the time and cost of your demolition job, lots of paper work to sign and then there’s the actual structural demolition!

To make the whole process a little less daunting we have put together a series of blogs called 'So you want to demolish a house'. Each instalment will walk you step-by-step through the process of demolishing - from getting a quote to the actual demolition.

It has taken us four weeks but we are finally here, to the part where the magic happens! That's right, at this point you should know all about getting your quote, council approval and asbestos removal, which means it is finally time to talk about the actual house demolition. 

 Time to talk about our favourite part of the job!

Time to talk about our favourite part of the job!

Given that performing residential demolition is a fairly big and multi-faceted undertaking, in this blog post we will use the term 'structural demolition', when referring to the part of the process where we turn your unwanted dwelling into rubble. 

A lot of people think of explosives or a wrecking ball when they think of structural demolition; however, most residential demolishers (including Home Demolitions) actually use excavators for this part of the process. This type of demolition, i.e demolition performed with excavators, is known as mechanical demolition.

 Sorry Miley, no wrecking balls here. 

Sorry Miley, no wrecking balls here. 

During structural demolition an excavator methodically knocks down the house, usually working segment by segment. This involves demolishing a wall or two and then sorting the rubble into bricks and waste before moving onto the next part of the house. 

Structural demolition varies greatly in the amount of time it takes: a small wooden shack could be down in just over an hour while a bigger brick home could easily take a couple of days. 

During this process trucks will also come to site to take away the waste products created from the demolition. Materials that can be re-used - such as bricks, pavers or tiles - are taken to be recycled while other materials are taken to the tip to become landfill.

 An excavator can make short work of even the strongest wall. 

An excavator can make short work of even the strongest wall. 

For this reason the location of your house can greatly affect how much your demolition job will cost. The further the site is from a tip, the more time, and therefore the more money, it will take to dispose of the waste. 

Here at Home Demolitions we care deeply for the environment and do our best to recycle everything we can from our demolition sites. This helps to preserve the environment by both reducing the amount of material going into landfill and reducing the amount of new building supplies needed. Plus, since we are able to sell recovered bricks and tiles to recycled building supply vendors like the Recycled Building Centre and Cheap As Bricks we can pass the saving on to you!

Related Content

So You Want To Demolish A House Part Three: Asbestos Removal

For the uninitiated, demolishing a house can be a daunting task. There are countless factors that can effect the time and cost of your demolition job, lots of paper work to sign and then there’s the actual structural demolition!

To make the whole process a little less daunting we have put together a series of blogs called 'So you want to demolish a house'. Each instalment will walk you step-by-step through the process of demolishing - from getting a quote to the actual demolition.

This week we thought we would talk about the elephant in the room, and by that we are of course referring to asbestos.

 Asbestos fibres can lead to serious health problems if inhaled so it is important asbestos is removed safely by a trained professional.

Asbestos fibres can lead to serious health problems if inhaled so it is important asbestos is removed safely by a trained professional.

It really is impossible to talk about demolition in Australia without talking about asbestos, as asbestos removal is a huge part of the demolition industry.

Asbestos has been banned in Australia for 15 years now, but the ban isn't retroactive, so if the home you are looking at demolishing was built before 1990 then there is a high chance it will contain asbestos in one form or another.

In Australia, asbestos is found in the home in two main forms:

Friable asbestos: The more dangerous of the two, friable asbestos has its fibres exposed. This type of asbestos was generally used in ceilings as insulation

Non-friable asbestos: Non-friable refers to asbestos fibres being suspended or encased in another material, such as cement. Asbestos fibre board, known colloquially as ‘fibro’, is the most common form of non-friable asbestos. 

Due to its warmer, more temperate climate, friable asbestos insulation products are usually not found in Sydney

 Asbestso removal in progress

Asbestso removal in progress

When an estimator comes to your property to give you a demolition quote, they will also identify any asbestos that needs to be removed before the excavators can start rolling in.

Even if the dwelling you are looking to demolish doesn’t have any visible asbestos, there is a good chance chance it could contain asbestos underneath tiles, in piping or behind fire places or splash backs. In some cases we have even discovered entire walls made out of asbestos sneakily hidden behind brick veneer!

 Asbestos has a habit of hiding where you least expect it, like behind this supposedly 'solid' brick wall. 

Asbestos has a habit of hiding where you least expect it, like behind this supposedly 'solid' brick wall. 

A few days before the structural demolition of the property starts, a trained asbestos crew will remove any and all asbestos contained in the house. Since asbestos fibres can lead to serious health problems if inhaled, the asbestos crew removes each panel of asbestos fibre board piece by piece without breaking it. The removed panels are then wrapped in plastic and placed in a skip for disposal.

As you would expect, this process is tedious and time consuming, but it is the only safe and legally compliant way to remove asbestos from a property. 

While this asbestos is being removed any tiles on the dwelling's roof will also be removed. This is so the tiles can be disposed of separately from any general waste. Since tiles are dense and heavy this saves on tipping costs and helps keep the price of your demolition down. 

Related Content

So You Want To Demolish A House Part Two: Development Approval And Service Disconnection

For the uninitiated, demolishing a house can be a daunting task. There are countless factors that can effect the time and cost of your demolition job, lots of paper work to sign and then there’s the actual structural demolition!

To make the whole process a little less daunting we have put together a series of blogs called 'So you want to demolish a house'. Each instalment will walk you step-by-step through the process of demolishing - from getting a quote to the actual demolition.

approved.jpg

In our first instalment we talked all about getting a demolition quote, and the sort of factors that will effect the price of your demo job. This time we are taking a look at what comes next after you have decided on a demolisher and signed your quote. 

Under the NSW Planning and Environmental Assessment Act the demolition of pretty much any structure counts as development. This means that approval is required before your demolisher can get started. 

This approval can be obtained in one of two ways:

The first, is by applying for Development Approval (known as DA) from council. This involves applying directly to your local council. It is worth noting that each council has its own requirements when it comes to applying for a DA so it pays to do your research.

 You must obtain approval either via a DA or CDC before demolition can begin. 

You must obtain approval either via a DA or CDC before demolition can begin. 

The second option is by organising a Complying Development Certificate (known as a CDC) which can be arranged by your contracted demolition company. In this scenario a third party certifier sends your application to council. Since CDC is a set requirement across all of NSW the requirements are always the same, regardless of what council your property is in. 

Generally speaking the CDC process takes 21 days in total: two weeks while the application sits with council followed by an additional seven day waiting period. 

During this time you are required to hand out letters to neighbouring properties informing them that demolition work will be taking place. These letters must be distributed at least seven days before demolition begins.

In addition to approval from council, all services must be disconnected from the property prior to demolition. This includes electricity, water, gas and NBN access if the property has it. If you pick Home Demolitions as your demolition contractor we can organise electricity, water and NBN disconnection for you. 

 Before the excavators come rolling in make sure all your ammenities have been disconnected!

Before the excavators come rolling in make sure all your ammenities have been disconnected!

A final thing to consider is whether the property has any air conditioning units. If it does the units must be professionally degassed before demolition can begin. Air conditioning units contain either R22 or R4 gas, and both are harmful to the environment. Under the Ozone protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas Management Act of 1989 it is illegal to discharge these gases into the environment and harsh fines apply for doing so. 

Related Content

So You Want To Demolish A House Part One: The Quote

For the uninitiated, demolishing a house can be a daunting task. There are countless factors that can affect the time and cost of your demolition job, lots of paper work to sign and then there’s the actual structural demolition. 

Plus, if you are demolishing with the intention of rebuilding you have to think about all this while liaising with a builder and planning your new dream home!

 Life's big questions: Where did we come from? Why are we here? How much will it cost to demolish my home?

Life's big questions: Where did we come from? Why are we here? How much will it cost to demolish my home?

So, to make the process a little less daunting we thought we would walk you through every step of the demolition process with a series of blogs. This first instalment takes a look at the first stop on your demolition journey: the quote.

Like we mentioned above, every demolition job is made up of a handful of variable factors. Factors like the slope of the land, the materials the house is made of, the location of the property, site access and the presence/amount of asbestos all affect the total cost of your demolition job. For this reason it would be impossible for us to provide an accurate quote over the phone; in order to do that we need to physically inspect the property. 

 Sure, it might not be rocket science, but providing an accurate quote is more complicated than you might think!

Sure, it might not be rocket science, but providing an accurate quote is more complicated than you might think!

Once you have filled out a demolition quote request, which will ask for some basic information about the property, we will contact you to arrange a time for our assessor to view the property destined for demolition. 

When visiting the site our assessor will also be able to establish whether additional services are required, including:

Asbestos removal: One of the most common services required when demolishing a house is the removal of asbestos. In order to be removed safely, asbestos containing products, like asbestos fibre cement sheeting, must be removed by hand and wrapped in plastic before being safely and legally disposed of. 

Tree lopping: Sometimes a demolition job will also require that trees and shrubbery are removed. Depending on the size and location of the tree this can be fairly straightforward or more complex, requiring specialised rigging and machinery.

Pool Removal: In addition to demolishing houses, we also have extensive experience removing unwanted pools. Once the cement and tiling is removed we can fill the empty pool site and ensure the filled land is compact enough to build on. 

Pool removal

Disconnection of ammenities: We can organise service disconnection for all the ammenities currently connected to the house. This includes water, gas, electricity, access to the NBN as well as degassing any air conditioner units in the property.   

Site Benching/ Levelling: In addition to demolition services if you are planning on rebuilding we can level and slope the land to your builder’s specifications. This eliminates the need for a third party excavator and means your builder can get to work even quicker. Just ask us and we can add the cost of site benching to your demolition quote!

As you can see there is more to a demolition quote than what you might think, but don’t worry, one of our experienced assessors will talk you through the process to ensure you get a competitive quote that includes all the services you require.

If you have any questions about the quoting process please don’t hesitate to get in contact!

Related Content

Demolition and the NBN

So, you're one of the lucky ones that has access to the NBN. You can get your cat videos extra fast, downloads done in a jiffy and dominate at online games without risk of lag. But what happens when it is time to demolish your NBN enabled property?

nbn101_101_3.jpg

This may seem like a pretty straightforward question, but given the ongoing issues with the NBN it is not overly surprising that the answer to the question is fairly hard to come by. Even the offical NBN website has little to say on the topic. 

But fear not! Us folks here at Home Demolitions have had experience organising NBN disconnection for the purposes of demolition and are here to guide you through the process. 

The first, and possibly most important, thing to remember is that any devices that were installed in the property to enable NBN access remain the property of NBN Co.

NBN co is the government corporation set up to design, build, roll-out and operate the NBN.

 Brb, just demolishing the interwebs.

Brb, just demolishing the interwebs.

The Network Termination Device (also known as the NTD or the NBN connection box) and a power supply would have been installed when the NBN was first enabled at the property and must be removed by NBN Co for demolition can commence.

The NTD and power supply are mounted to a wall inside the house. The NTD is a small white device that resembles a modem or router while the power supply is the larger white device with two blue buttons (see image below).

NBN Battery.jpg

The NBN lead in cabling, which connects the NTD in the house to the node on the street,  must also be disconnected before demolition begins.. This cabling can be disconnected by a third party cabling provider authorised by the NBN.

If this still sounds confusing, don’t worry, if you choose Home Demolitions for your demolition project we can handle the NBN disconnection for you as part of our utility disconnection service

Although we obviously can’t remove any of the NBN provided infrastructure, we can liaise with NBN Co on your behalf, streamlining the process and saving you the hassle of having to organise disconnection yourself.  

Related Content

Mechanical Demolition: An overview

When we tell people that we are in the demolitions business, one of the questions we are frequently asked - well, apart from ‘how much will it cost to demolish my home?’ - is 'oh, so does that mean you use explosives?’.

As much as we wish that our 9 to 5 involved chucking sticks of lit dynamite around like some sort of crazed miner from the wild west, this is not the case. 

 'That's the last time I go with Yosemite Sam's discount demolitions'

'That's the last time I go with Yosemite Sam's discount demolitions'

Demolition using explosives - a technique called building implosion which refers to the way the demolished structure collapses in on itself -  is generally used for larger structures like smokestacks, stadiums and skyscrapers.

This technique involves strategically placing numerous small explosives around the building so that the explosion occurs in a controlled manner. Although the actual ‘demolition’ is quick, preparing the condemned structure for building implosion can be extremely time consuming, with larger structures can taking as long as six months to prepare.

 Geez, calm down Neil, we know 'building implosion' isn't an actual 'implosion'.

Geez, calm down Neil, we know 'building implosion' isn't an actual 'implosion'.

In short, implosion demolition is simply not suitable or feasible for residential demolition. Plus, even if it was, chances are your neighbours might not be too happy with us blowing stuff up right outside their window!

Home Demolitions conducts all of its demolition work using excavators in a method known as mechanical demolition.

The term mechanical demolition refers to any demolition work that uses powered mobile plant (such as excavators, cranes, loaders and bulldozers). It can also involve a mix of hand demolition and mechanical demolitions techniques. The latter is true of how Home Demolitions performs demolition works. 

 One day all of man's achievements will be naught but rubble. 

One day all of man's achievements will be naught but rubble. 

During structural demolition - this refers to the demolition of the actual structure that occurs once any asbestos, roof tiles and salvageable fittings have been removed - machinery is used in addition to a labourer. 

Structural demolition of a residential property usually involves two people: an excavator operator and a labourer. The excavator operator systematically knocks down the structure while the labourer removes rubble and debris out of the way and sprays down the site with water to avoid dust clouds polluting the air.

When performed by a skilled operator structural demolition is quick, efficient and relatively tidy. The operator works methodically, systematically destroying one section of the house at a time and removing recyclable materials like bricks as they go.

Related Content

How Long Does It Take To Demolish A House?

Aside from costs, one of the most common things people want to know when they are considering demolishing their home is how long it will take.

As with a lot of these general demolition questions there unfortunately isn’t a simple or  ‘one-size-fits-all' style answer.

The reality is that every house is very different and is composed of a variety of factors that will all impact the demolition time required.

 Although barely perceivable to mortal man, the ravages of time will one day come for us all. 

Although barely perceivable to mortal man, the ravages of time will one day come for us all. 

With that in mind, we thought we would provide a quick overview of these factors and how they can affect the time required to demolish your home.

Note: The following information assumes that you are going the traditional demolition route. 

The first, and possibly biggest, variable that impacts demolition time is the presence of asbestos.

In the past we have written rather extensively about the asbestos removal process and what is involved in demolishing a house containing the dangerous substance.  

Without going into too much detail, asbestos removal is tedious and time consuming as each panel containing asbestos has to be removed by hand. Depending on the size of the house and how much asbestos is present this could take anywhere between a couple of hours or a couple of days. 

Some asbestos removal cases are particularly involved, such as an asbestos cladded fibro home we demolished that featured a brick veneer (photo below).  In order to access the panels for removal the brick veneer had to be demolished by hand, resulting in a week long asbestos removal job. 

 This asbestos clad fibro home had a brick facade making for a particuarly time consuming asbestos removal job. 

This asbestos clad fibro home had a brick facade making for a particuarly time consuming asbestos removal job. 

Once the asbestos has been stripped and tiles have been removed from the roof, structural demolition can begin. Structural demolition is performed with an excavator and involves systematically knocking down one part of the structure at a time. 

This is where huge variations in time can occur, depending on what material the house is made out of and how big it is.

For example a small asbestos clad fibro home could be demolished in as little as 20 minutes (post-asbestos removal of course) while a larger brick home could take as long as a couple of days. 

 Once the asbestos had been removed, this (formerly) asbestos clad fibro  home took around 20 minutes to demolish.

Once the asbestos had been removed, this (formerly) asbestos clad fibro  home took around 20 minutes to demolish.

As well as size, the slope of the land and street access also play a role in the time required for your demolition. The more accessible the site, the larger the truck that can access it. A larger truck means that the removal of debris and recyclable materials happens quicker, potentially speeding up the process. 

Some other factors that affect your demolition timeline include:

  • Demolition letters and asbestos removal letters which are sent out to neighbouring properties a week and two weeks respectively, before work can commence. 
  • If there are trees on the property that need to be removed. In particular larger trees will require a licensed arborist and may require council approval to cut down. 
  • Depending on the council, a sediment control plan may need to be in place on the site. This could include on-site sediment control measures such as erecting Geo-fabric fencing. 

So, there you have it. While this is by no means a comprehensive or definitive guide to the factors that can affect demolition time, it should provide you with a basic understanding of just how long it could take to turn your property in to a clean block of land.   

Related Content

Early warning signs of termite infestation

They might be tiny, but a termite infestation is a huge problem -  especially when it is your house on the menu. Commonly known as white ants, subterranean termites, are highly organised and interdependent creatures that are capable of eating through the wall and roofing of a newly constructed home within three months. If nothing else you have to admire their efficiency!

Although well known for their timber eating abilities, only one type of termite in the colony is actually capable of digesting wood: the humble worker termite. Worker termites do this thanks to a symbiotic organism in their gut, called a protozoa, and regurgitate the processed food to the other termites in the nest. When venturing outside of the nest, worker termites travel in mud tubes to protect themselves from their ancient enemy, the ant!

 Artist's impression of Termite/ Ant rivalry 

Artist's impression of Termite/ Ant rivalry 

Termites thrive in warm, humid conditions, so with that in mind it is not surprising that Sydney is a termite hotspot. Although they favour built up urban areas, all of Sydney is at high risk of termite infestation, particularly those properties in close proximity to gum trees. 

 Sydney homes are at high risk of termite infestation - map provided by CSIRO

Sydney homes are at high risk of termite infestation - map provided by CSIRO

An infestation is a serious matter, since, as mentioned before, termites can eat through wood with incredible speed causing significant and irreparable structural damage. Such damage can even, in the worst cases, lead to spontaneous collapse - as recently happened to a termite ridden carport in Hawaii. 

 This carport has certainly seen better days. 

This carport has certainly seen better days. 

It is worth knowing that most insurance policies don’t cover terminate infestations as they are viewed as a preventable problem related to home maintenance. 

So what can I do to prevent termites from infesting my home? Well, since hiring a rag-tag gang of ant mercenaries to patrol your house for termites isn’t exactly possible, a better option is to keep an eye out for signs of termite infestation.

Things to look out for include:

  • Mud tubes, which are small tunnels made from soil running along the outside of your house
  • Tiny holes in wood
  • Small cracks in wood
  • Termite dung, these look more like sawdust than actual droppings.
 A mud tube -  a common sign of termite infestation. 

A mud tube -  a common sign of termite infestation. 

Unfortunately, early detection and extermination isn’t much use if your house has already taken irreversible structural damage due to termites. If the structure has been weakened beyond repair then only one option remains: demolition. As well as disposing of the termite infested structure and materials, demolishing allows you to start again on a blank, termite-free slate. 

 

How Much Does It Cost To Demolish A House with Asbestos?

If your house was built between 1920 through to 1990 there’s a good chance it contains asbestos. While some houses, like the humble fibro shack, wear their asbestos loud and proud, other homes have been renovated to conceal any asbestos. A preliminary site inspection can help to determine if and where any asbestos is located. 

 demolition Sydney, cheapest prices demolition Sydney, asbestos removal, cheapest asbestos removal Sydney

Regardless of where the asbestos is located in your house, it is important that it is disposed of correctly.  Unfortunately, this process is fairly time consuming as each element containing asbestos must be carefully removed, wrapped and then gently placed in a skip for proper disposal. Although tedious, there is no other way to safely remove unwanted asbestos (is there any other kind?). For this reason asbestos costs roughly three times the amount to remove as other building materials. The removed asbestos is then taken to a specialised site and disposed of. It costs roughly 30 cents to dispose of one kilo of asbestos (about $330 a tonne).

 Fibro boards like these contain asbestos and are usually hidden between wood and plaster. 

Fibro boards like these contain asbestos and are usually hidden between wood and plaster. 

I get it, asbestos is expensive and time consuming to remove, but how much will it actually cost to demolish an asbestos clad home? Unfortunately, there is no straight forward figure as the presence of asbestos is just one of the many factors that can impact the price of a home demolition. Generally speaking, demolishing a one story family home containing asbestos will cost somewhere between $15,000 to $22,000; however, this number will vary greatly depending on other factors such as the material the house is made out of and the amount of asbestos present. 

The easiest way to get an accurate picture of how much you need to spend to knock down a house containing asbestos is to fill out our simple quote request tool. This takes just a couple of minutes and will allow our friendly staff to provide you with an accurate and obligation free quote.

 Old sheds like this often have roofs made out of 'Super Six', a product that contains asbestos.

Old sheds like this often have roofs made out of 'Super Six', a product that contains asbestos.

All quotes include the cost of an asbestos certificate, which is required by council and builders in order for new construction to commence on the site of your demolished home. 

Related Content

Demolition, Development Applications and Councils

With 30 different local government areas in The Sydney Metropolitan Area, each with their own specific twists and variances to the NSW Environmental Planning and Assessment Act (1979) - it's no wonder that the process of applying to knock down a house to build a new one seems daunting to say the least. With approximately 18,000 new developments being approved in NSW over the past year alone, it's surprising that no one has yet managed to streamline the rigmarole of managing development, particularly for straight forward residential structures.

 Demolition in Sydney and Council

Defined as ‘development’ under the aforementioned NSW Environmental Planning and Assessment Act; Demolition of just about any structure technically requires consent of local Council. Exceptions are made for authorised works that fall into the category of ‘exempt development’, ‘complying development’ or under a Council Order.
Some demolition work is permitted under State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008 as ‘complying development’. If you meet all requirements of the SEPP for ‘complying development’ you can lodge a Complying Development Certificate (CDC) Application with most Councils or an Accredited Certifier. 

 council DA demolish sydney

In saying all of this however, the exact specifics as to what may fall under The State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) (2008) is a subjective matter open to many avenues of interpretation. Further, the NSW Environmental Planning and Assessment Act of 1979, as the year suggests is a little antiquated to say the least, with the majority of definitions pertaining directly to development of properties on "Crown Land" - so what does this mean for you, the aspiring developer, who knows? 

  "Crown property!  I think not"  - Skippy the Kangaroo

"Crown property! I think not" 
- Skippy the Kangaroo

Asbestos Cladded Fibro Homes: The demolition process.

 #SkeletalRemains

#SkeletalRemains

Depending on the particular style of your home, whether it be double brick, vener, timber or a fibro shack - certain preliminary site works will need to be undertaken to ensure efficiency and safety throughout the duration of the demolition process. 
At the top of this to do list comes the removal of any asbestos containing elements or fittings of the house, commonly Australian homes built from 1940 through to 1990 will contain asbestos products within area most susceptible to prolonged exposure to moisture or heat "think of wet area splash backs and fireplaces or stove surrounds" whilst some homes have been renovated to conceal, contain or even hide these fibre board products, some simply display their past loud and proud, as is found in the essential Australian classic, fibro shack.

Fibro shed demolish

So, if any material that contains asbestos need to be removed prior to demolition, and the entire house is made out of fibro asbestos board, where does this leave you at the end of the day. Well, as seen from the images above and below, the answer is, not much!
Although painfully time consuming, there are no known alternatives to the process of carefully removing each panel individually, wrapping in a protective film and delicately placing each section in a skip for transport to a treatment facility. Whilst taking a little longer in prep work, the removal of remaining materials such as the timber frame and concrete slabs is generally pretty quick given that very little is in the way to stop the brute force of a 25 tonne excavator. 

fibro shack demolish

KnockDown Rebuild,

knock down rebuild 2017

So, you're looking to demolish a house with the sole intention of building a new one in it's place, or what is known to those in the industry as a knock down rebuild "abbreviated as KDR in some circles" but aren't sure where to start? It's more than understandable that many might find the process confusing and tiresome, given the complexity of the project and hey, it's not something people do everyday, in fact, it's something that few people will ever do in a lifetime -but don't let that stop you from having the home of your dreams.

Demolish Rebuild

Whilst there is a wealth of information and first hand experiences shared across various channels of the internet, the majority of these articles look at the process from a builders perspective with little regard for the course of demolition beforehand. Granted, the process of building a new house may seem more interesting and is thus more commonly discussed than the demolishing an old one but in reality, order of operations means that you simply cannot start building your new home until the old one comes down. 

Rebuild after Demolition

Interestingly enough, there are very few companies that actually provide a complete demolition and build package with most businesses focusing on one or the other, although it may seem logical and cost effective for a business to provide both services, the truth is that it's just too much to handle, with each stage off the project requiring a different set of permits, resources and skilled workers - the care and level of attention required to complete both tasks to perfection are better orchestrated from two seperate approaches. There is however a cross over of tasks that are somewhat universal and can be performed by either contractor, works such as excavation, benching, levelling and importing or exporting fill from the block can be actioned by either the builder or demolisher (there are even companies that specialise solely in excavation if you should so wish to employ additional contractors) and so it definitely pays to check provisions within the scope of works from all parties to your project to ensure that 1) you're not paying for the same service twice 2) you're getting the most competitive rate possible. 

Demolish to build new

You may be thinking "how complex can it really be to demolish a house?" and the straight answer is, not too complex, but it is an art that takes many years of practice to get right. Whilst the average consumer may not be entirely fussed about the particulate size of matter left on site, the gradient of the land or the depth to which a tree stump has been ground, the builder that you've engaged certainly does and thus is imperative that the demolishers that you contract have a good understanding and working relationship with the builders of your new home. Remembering that most builders will simply stop work if any element of the site is not to their individual standards. The average cost of demolishing a structure is generally no more than 2% of the total build cost and with approvals to build new dwellings often times being much easier to obtain than that to demolish an existing one, maybe it's about time that we all start giving a little more attention to the demolition befor getting too carried away with the rebuild phase of development.

How much does it cost to demolish a house?

 Hypotenuse, Pythagoras - aaaargh, just knock down my house!

Hypotenuse, Pythagoras - aaaargh, just knock down my house!

"How much will it cost to demolish my house?" ~ Great question!
 

Well, if you're reading this, it's most likely that you're trying to get a rough idea on the cost of demolishing your existing house "presumably to build a new one" because, let's face it, there's a whole heap of varied information across the internet but not a lot of definitive answers.
 

But why is that? Well, the cost of demolishing any structure is subject to a multitude of variables which can dramatically dictate the total cost of the project, for example, asbestos contaminated materials are not only more labor intensive to remove, requiring the employment of trained professionals but also costs approximately 3 times as much to safely dispose of in contrast to other materials like concrete or timber.

Other factors range from the particular gradient of the property, the existence of established trees or plants, the placement of essential services like water, gas and electricity through to the properties proximity to the nearest recycling or disposal facility.
 

"Gosh! Just tell me a price." Anywhere from $10,000 to $80,000, these are the extremes of either end but for your average Sydney 3 bedroom home, you will be looking at around fifteen to twenty thousand dollars. 

You may be a couple years off beginning your new development, heck - you may not even have purchased a house yet but it's always better off knowing what you're getting yourself into because lets face it, you cant build your dream home until you remove the existing structures from your land. 


Our simple online quote request tool takes just a couple of minutes to complete and enables our staff to give a fast and accurate quote based upon our many years of experience and knowledge. Feel free to request your obligation free quote today!

Related content